5 Reasons to Adopt a Senior Cat

We're coming up on the end of Adopt-a-Senior-Pet month, so to finish off our promotion, we’re highlighting five reasons you should consider adopting an older cat. Our senior cats will be the first to tell you that age is just a number! 

  16-year-old Nancy is ready to charm her way into your heart. Photo by Cathy Niland.

16-year-old Nancy is ready to charm her way into your heart. Photo by Cathy Niland.

SENIOR CATS HAVE ESTABLISHED PERSONALITIES

Unlike kittens, whose personalities can take a few years to develop, senior cats have already matured and established their character traits. Barring something traumatic, you usually have a pretty good idea of who you’re getting when you adopt an elderly cat.

Keep in mind it can take a senior cat (just like any animal, young and old) time to adjust to new living arrangements—particularly if they suddenly found themselves in a shelter after living with one family for several years. But with a little time and patience, you're sure to have your senior's heart in no time!

SENIORS GET PASSED OVER

All too often, senior cats are overlooked at shelters in favor of younger kittens. But elderly cats have just as much love and compassion to offer as a younger cat. Finding homes for shelter seniors can be difficult, so bringing one home is truly an incredible gift!

  Aris is one of our younger seniors at just 7-years-old. Help her enjoy her golden years!

Aris is one of our younger seniors at just 7-years-old. Help her enjoy her golden years!

SENIOR CATS ARE ALREADY TRAINED

A huge benefit to adopting an older cat is that they’re probably well-trained when it comes to things like litter box usage and proper play behavior. They likely know they shouldn’t attack or bite your hands or feet during playtime, and that your furniture isn’t a scratching post. 

SENIOR CATS REQUIRE LESS SUPERVISION

Depending on your schedule, a senior cat may be a better fit for you and your family. Young kittens need a lot of attention and stimulation, and their natural curiosity means they also need a lot of supervision! In contrast, older cats tend to be much more independent and can be left home alone for most of the day. 

SENIOR CATS' HEALTH NEEDS ARE KNOWN

Unlike a kitten, a senior cat comes fully equipped with vaccinations and health records. Adopting a senior means you'll know your cat's full medical report, taking much of the guess work out of their care, and eliminating expensive vaccination costs. 

For some, adopting a senior with medical needs might not be an option. That's why at Cat Town, many of our elderly cats are part of our In-It-For-Life program, where we'll cover vet bills until the end. With the burden of medical costs removed, we can make sure our senior population has the very best chance at finding the loving home they deserve. 

  Newman might be 10-years-old, but he doesn't let that stop him from playing to his heart's content!

Newman might be 10-years-old, but he doesn't let that stop him from playing to his heart's content!

Cats can live well into their teens or even into their twenties, so don’t let a cat’s age stop you from adopting!

Check out our complete gallery of seniors, and read their full bios by clicking on their photos. Be sure to email info@cattownoakland.org to learn more about adopting a senior companion.

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