Our House is Now a Home with Elsa

Our House is Now a Home with Elsa

When Elsa arrived at Cat Town, she wanted nothing to do with people and even less to do with other cats. She tucked herself into corners and did her best impression of a turtle, retracting her head any time a hand came near. My fellow volunteers and I worked to soften her, but had little success.

A few weeks into her stay, my boyfriend, Elliot and I stopped by. We both agreed that something about Elsa’s lack of interest made her all the more lovable. Elliot reached into the cubby where Elsa was hiding to let her sniff his hand, and for the first time, she did. We didn’t know it then, but our fates were sealed in that tiny moment.

KITTEN WIRE: HOW WE GET FROM FEARFUL TO FRIENDLY

KITTEN WIRE: HOW WE GET FROM FEARFUL TO FRIENDLY

OAKLAND — It usually starts with some stinky food.

When the shy, stressed or sick young rescues arrive at Cat Town, we turn to proven techniques and time-tested tools — like extra funky food treats — to begin the socialization process. Then there's the way we talk to the cats. How we walk in a room. How we introduce toys. And the way we document each step so dozens of volunteers and the staff who care for them understands their medical and social progress.